The Argument for Photographic Purism

Stan at Netflix, 2008

These days, when I look at an image, I often want to know if it’s “true.” Now true is a dicey word. Photography by its very nature is an abstraction, and even the pioneers of “pure seeing” realized, as Edward Weston wrote in 1932, that photography involved a “willful distortion of fact.” It’s a slippery slope — from…

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Living a creative life, a student of high magic, and hopefully growing wiser as I age. • Ex-Lucasfilm, Netflix, Adobe. • Here are my stories and photos.

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M. H. Rubin

M. H. Rubin

Living a creative life, a student of high magic, and hopefully growing wiser as I age. • Ex-Lucasfilm, Netflix, Adobe. • Here are my stories and photos.

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